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Statistical Accounts of Scotland

Stirlingshire

Old and New Statistical Accounts

Airth Bothkennar Drymen Killearn Logie Slamannan
Alva Buchanan Falkirk Kilsyth Muiravonside Stirling
Baldernock Campsie Fintry Kippen Polmont Strathblane
Balfron Denny Gargunnock Larbert & Dunipace St Ninian's

Click on parish for text 

BuchananDrymenKippenGargunnockSt NiniansStirlingLogieAlvaBalfronKillearnFintryStrathblaneBaldernockCampsieKilsythAirthLarbert and DunipaceDennyBothkennarPolmontMuiravonsideSlamannanFalkirk

The OSA references below are to the Edina site. In most cases they are to the main entry on roads for each parish but some additional links are provided to other relevant information. When Edina page appears go to browse scanned pages for the link.

NSA references are to the GoogleBooks site, usually to the means of communication section. There may be other passing references to roads in a parish account.

Additional information about parishes can be found on the Vision of Britain site.


Airth
The Clackmannanshire Bridge, 2009

OSA (bridges & ferries) - on Edina page go to browse scanned pages
There are 5 bridges on the river. The Abbey-town bridge (NMRS record) on the Dunmore/Airth to Carron and Falkirk road is thought to have been on a direct road to an abbey in Airth.
There are ferries on the Forth at Kersie and Higginís Neuk with piers on both sides. A boat sails between Airth and Dunmore to Alva once a day. There are harbours at Airth, Dunmore and Newmiln.


NSA

Kincardine Bridge - the ferry slip was on the left of the picture

Mention of Kincardine Ferry.
The Pow is crossed by some small bridges, one of which is called the Abbey Town Bridge. The nearest market town is Falkirk, six miles away.
There are 8 miles of turnpike road; the Glasgow to Alloa coach runs each day and the Glasgow to Kirkcaldy coach runs three days a week.
A fair for hiring shearers is held each July. Coal is obtained a few miles away.

Alva
OSA
No mention

NSA
p. 185 There are five carters in the village. A carrier goes weekly to Stirling and Glasgow.

Baldernock
OSA
There is not enough money to repair the many roads in the parish. Some of the less useful should be closed up and the money used on the more important roads. A good turnpike from Balfron to Glasgow passes through the parish although it is some distance from the centre.

NSA
Although Glasgow, the nearest market town is only 7 miles away, there are no coaches or carriers and no post which places the parish at a great disadvantage.
A link from the Balfron to Glasgow road has long been proposed and has now been surveyed. Once made we will have two turnpike roads, the other being a road running from west to east though the parish.
Many parish roads are needed but the statute labour money will be insufficient for their maintenance.
One fair is held each year, for milk cows, but little business is now done. Most of the coal is obtained locally though some comes from Glasgow by the canal.

Balfron
OSA
Until recently roads were almost impassable in winter but are now much improved.
There is a two-arch bridge over the Endrick at Ballindalloch - when "swelled" this river is rapid and dangerous. There is a turnpike between Glasgow and Balfron which links to the military road between Stirling and Dumbarton and one from Kippen to Glasgow. Other roads and bridges are now being built.

NSA ; see also p. 302
Balfron is 15 miles from Stirling although the road there is longer. The roads to Glasgow and Dumbarton, although good do not have lines "which engineers of the present school would adopt." There are daily carriers to Glasgow as well as a coach and a postal service. There are just under 4 miles of turnpike road.
Since the last Account of 1793 the roads are much improved though more can still be done, and our communication with other places has greatly improved. The arrival of the first caravan for the "conveyance of goods and passengers" was quite an event.

Bothkennar
Parish map - sheet 31, just north of Falkirk
OSA
Old people remember when the roads were near impassable but these are now in good condition except in heavy rain or flood. A new bridge is to be built across the Carron just above Grangemouth and a new road from Grangemouth to Alloa and Stirling.

NSA
The parish is well served by roads which are maintained by statute labour. Falkirk is the market town. Coal is obtained locally.

Buchanan
OSA
Timber is taken by water from the shores of Loch Lomond to Glasgow, Port Glasgow, Greenock and sometimes Ireland and the west of England.
There is a new road between Drymen and Rowardennan from where the Dunbarton to Inverary road can be reached by ferry. There are quays both at Rowardennan and Arrochar. Horses are available at a public house. The road from Drymen is only now complete after 30 years work under the statute labour system.
A garrison was built at Inversnaid about 80 years ago to prevent stolen cattle being moved north through the pass between Loch Catrine and Loch Lomond.

NSA ; also
The parish has no turnpike roads and there is no post office.
There is a need to extend the road from Rowardennan up to Glenfalloch to reach the Arrochar turnpike, and also to repair the road to Inversnaid garrison which would allow west Perthshire to be reached by Glenarklet.

Campsie

Campsie kirk Looking from the kirk up to the Crow road - at some point a track was made up the hill

OSA
A turnpike leaves the Military Road (Stirling to Dumbarton) at Kippen and runs to Glasgow. Another road runs east west between the great Edinburgh road at Auchinreach and the Strathblane to Glasgow turnpike on the west. In addition, two miles of the Glasgow to Edinburgh turnpike by Falkirk runs through the parish and two cross roads run from this to Kirkintilloch.
There are 20 miles of road in the parish, 10 of which are maintained by statute labour. Prior to the conversion of statute labour the roads were "miserable indeed".
Although there were 101 plough gates both in spring and autumn with each equating to the labour of a man and horse for 3 days, the reluctance to work and the lack of skilled supervision and careless method of working led to the roads being in very poor condition and almost impassable in winter.
The conversion money raises 70 L per annum and up to 3 years ago this was spent on 18 of the 20 miles of road in the parish. Now, with one line of road being turnpiked, all this money will be spent on 10 miles of this road and minor roads connecting to the other turnpikes.
One obvious link is between Campsie Kirk and the Crow Road (leading to Fintry and Stirling) - it would be only 600 yards long but would save 3 miles.
Despite being a hilly district, there are very few pulls.
There are 19 stone bridges, 4 of which cross the Kelvin.
There are several causeways on the line of road to the church, said to have been built by offenders in the past as a penance. These are about six feet wide, formed of a large whinstone in the middle with smaller ones on each side.
One noticeable defect in the roads is that due to the soil being gravely, a thaw after severe frost can make the ground very spongy and travel difficult.
It has sometimes been proposed to have a turnpike from Kilsyth to the Military Road near Buchanan House. It would run through the straths of Campsie, Strathblane and Killearn, with a bridge over the Leven at the boat of Balloch. This would make travel between Edinburgh and the West Highlands shorter than through Glasgow or Stirling. Recently a turnpike bill has been passed which will allow such a road to be built through Fintry and the valley of the Blane.
Cottars and tradesmen complain about having to pay 2/- in lieu of four days statute labour despite the benefit they gain from the improved roads and the fact that it costs them much less than having to provide 4 days labour.
The development of transport in the parish is shown by some facts from the past:
• In 1714 there were no carts or chaisses; the gentry rode to church
• In 1744 there was no chaisse in the parish; only a few carts with timber wheels which were used for moving manure in spring time
• In 1759 there were two wheeled chaisses and 20 carts with iron-shod wheels
• In 1794 there were 200 carts, 4 post-chaisses, 3 coaches and one 2-wheeled chaisse.

NSA
There is an east-west road from Strathblane to Kilsyth which is crossed by one from Glasgow over the Campsies to Fintry and Kippen. The Glasgow- Kilsyth- Stirling road passes through the SE corner of the parish. A coach runs to and from Lennoxtown to Glasgow five times a week.

Denny
OSA
The roads are in good repair.

NSA
There is a bridge (NMRS record) over the Carron called Denny-bridge.
The old village lies on the road to Falkirk and Edinburgh.
A new turnpike road enters Denny from the south with a bridge over the Sclanders Burn. There is a new bridge on the Fintry road, 5 miles west of Denny. Beyond Broomage tollbar, the road splits near Hags to give two routes to Glasgow.
Denny has a post office. There are over ten miles of turnpike here. More than twenty public carriages pass through each day in wintertime. Bridges are well kept. There are two fairs. Coal is obtained locally.

Drymen
OSA
Nearest market town is Dumbarton, 11 miles away. Glasgow is 18 miles. Lime and coal are brought from Kilpatrick, some 11 or 12 miles away. Many vagrant beggars.
No mention of roads

The Clachan, a droving inn licensed in 1734

NSA
Apart from the Glasgow markets, produce is sold at Duntocher and at towns on the Leven.
There are ten miles of the Glasgow and Dumbarton road by Drymen to Stirling, and 35 miles of parish road. The latter are maintained by statute labour at a cost of L120; and are not always in the best condition.
There is a fine bridge one mile from Drymen over the Endrick that was built in 1765, and the Finnich bridge which crosses a ravine - it has recently been widened and improved.
A stage coach runs to and from Glasgow three times a week; there is also a weekly carrier and a daily postal service.
Coal is expensive because of the distance it is brought from Garscube, hence many use peat which is easily obtained.

Falkirk
OSA Callendar House
p. 72 The north road between Edinburgh and Glasgow runs through the town as does the road to Stirling and the North Highlands.
p. 90 A canal crosses the Glasgow to Stirling road on an aqueduct.
p. 93 People in Grangemouth who have to go to the custom house in Boíness sometimes have to travel by Linlithgow bridge when the Avon cannot be forded - this adds four miles to their journey.
p. 83 There are three trysts, several fairs and a weekly market..
Near Callendar House there is an earth wall that branches off Grahamís Dyke and runs over to the old castle of Almond - it may have continued to a camp at Linlithgow and may have been a road.

Falkirk NSA; Romans; Means of Communication, Roads & Bridges
A Roman road runs through the parish from Castlecary fort to Camelon. Some parts are still used as a road. Falkirk is the only market town. The turnpike between Edinburgh and Stirling and Glasgow runs through the centre of the town. The town is usually busy but more especially on market and fair days and when the cattle trysts are held. These take place at Stenhousemuir, 3 miles away.
Means of Communication   The main post office is in Falkirk with several smaller ones elsewhere in the parish. Post goes twice a day to Edinburgh and Glasgow Stirling and Alloa etc. Runners deliver the mail throughout the parish each day. Passage boats run to Edinburgh and Glasgow on both the Union canal and the Forth and Clyde canal (at Lock No.16) several times during the day and night. There are two coaches daily to Edinburgh, Glasgow and Stirling and daily coaches to Dunfermline and Kirkcaldy.
Roads   There are ten miles of turnpike road with many parish roads funded by the statute labour.
Bridges   There are bridges over the Carron and water of Bonny including a drawbridge over the Carron on the way to Bothkennar which allows vessels to pass through. There are five drawbridges over the Forth & Clyde canal and several roads cross the Union canal by bridges. One mile west of Falkirk the turnpike road used to pass under the Forth & Clyde canal but it now crosses over it by a drawbridge. Coal is obtained locally.

Fintry
OSA
There is a cotton mill at Culcruich beside the turnpike road.
Peat is used but too much time is spent in obtaining it.
It is only in the past couple of years that the formidable obstacles to communicating with other places have been overcome. Access was very difficult with a near perpendicular hill between here and Campsie and Glasgow which half-laden horses could hardly negotiate, and deep mosses to the north and west. Two local gentlemen, at much expense to themselves, obtained an act of parliament for new roads in the west of the county. Now the roads are as good as anywhere.
The Craw Road comes from Glasgow and the gradients are much easier - it runs up to the military road between Stirling and Dumbarton six miles north of here. The county road on the west has now been repaired. There are many bridges over streams which used to be difficult to cross. The bridge over the Endrick has four arches and the bridge on the old line of road, one mile upstream from this, has two arches.

NSA ; fuel
The Kippen to Glasgow coach which ran for several years through here is no longer in business. Carriers run to Glasgow every two days.
There is no post office. The large cotton factory built some 45 years ago has helped improve the roads somewhat but its distance from Glasgow and the hilly road between makes carriage of its produce very expensive. Coals also come by this very hilly road, from Kirkintilloch.

Gargunnock
OSA: roads in the carse ; boats ; military road
The muir is accessed by narrow passes called ballochs.
General Campbell of Boquhan has recently built an excellent road, six miles long, from the ford of Frew to his muirland - it is suitable for carts. Initially the tenants of the muir were hostile but they now accept it.
All roads in the carse (excepting Boquhan and Micklewood) are very bad and near impassable for carts - even travel on horseback is difficult. Farmers often complain about the roads and say they will work on them but as soon as the weather improves they forget about the problem. The best solution would be for landlords to make roads to farms and recover the outlay from the rents.
Beggars pass through the parish and prove a nuisance.
The Military Road runs through the parish.
Coal is brought 10 miles from Bannockburn.
Tenants beside the Forth have boats but these are not suitable for horses or loaded carts.
A bridge is required near Micklewood - the bridge at the ford of the Frew "does not sufficiently accommodate those for many milesÖ"
The Military Road between Stirling and Dumbarton, made 30 or 40 years ago, is to become a turnpike. So long as the trustees confine their work to reducing gradients on the road and shortening distances there are clear benefits. However, if new lines of road are made, unnecessary expense would be incurred in purchasing and enclosing land, and some villages would be by-passed. The benefits of improvements made to lands on the assumption that the present road would continue would be lost.

NSA; bridge; miscellaneous observations
The Peel of Gargunnock is thought to have protected a ford. Further upriver a small fortress defended the Ford of Frew. Just half a mile above the Peel there was an old bridge called the bridge of Offers (NMRS record) which Wallace is said to have used. Its remains can still be seen. A suspension bridge was built near here some nine years ago along with a two mile stretch of road leading to the Stirling - Callendar road.
Stirling is the nearest market town, some six miles away. There is no post office although there is a delivery and collection each day made by the Kippen post.
Four miles of the Stirling to Dumbarton road passes through the parish. A new line of road was made fairly recently half a mile from the village. This is a turnpike road and a stagecoach runs on it on Fridays from Kippen to the Stirling market. The bridges are in good condition.
Coal comes from Bannockburn and peat is obtained from the moss of Kincardine along with some from the Lennox Hills where sleds are used to transport it.
Although the new road through the carse is a better road it is less scenic than the old Dumbarton road. This ran past Touch, Gargunnock House, the village, Leckie and Boquhan to Kippen. Some think that a new road should be made from Fintry through the east side of Balfron parish to pass along the foot of the Lennox hills above Boquhan and Leckie to the new stretch of the Dumbarton road in Gargunnock near the new bridge over the Forth. Others think it should come down between Boquhan and Leckie to the Dumbarton road. Routing it through the "dryfield" part of the parish would make it the shortest route between the Dunblane area and Glasgow.

Killearn
OSA ; Black Mail
There are two turnpikes. The statute labour rate is 18s per 100 L Scots for parish roads but these are still quite poor.
Cattle thieving was common up to 1743. Protection was offered to cattle owners by means of "Black Mail".

NSA
The remoteness from fuel, manure and markets is a disadvantage. Before carts were used, coal was brought on horseback. Some twelve miles of turnpike roads were built between 1790 and 1800 but are hillier and longer than they could have been. The smoothness and firmness of the Macadamised surface allows heavier loads to be drawn by horses.

Kilsyth
OSA: Bridges ; roads ; new road by Cumbernauld
All the streams on the Glasgow road are bridged. The most significant bridges are over the Carron, and over the Kelvin at Auchinstenie. Antiquarians had thought that the Auchinstenie bridge was Roman because of it being near the Roman wall and its appearance (9 foot wide, no parapets, a footway on either side, and 6 arches). This is now discounted as the remains of a paved ford were found near the bridge and there was a tradition of someone perishing 100 years ago on the ford. Old records show that the bridge is fairly recent as an application to build a bridge was made in 1670.
The roads are good with many carts and carriages. In the past the roads were narrow, rugged and far too steep.
Up to two years ago the main road between Edinburgh and Glasgow ran through Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch and was very busy. With the opening of the new road via Cumbernauld there is now hardly any traffic through here. There used to be two flys, a dozen post-chaisses and 20-odd post horses in the village but these have mostly gone. The income from the old road (a turnpike) has dropped from £145 to £51 with hardly any profit.

NSA
Kilsyth lies on the northernmost road from Edinburgh to Glasgow and just 50 years ago was very busy with traffic. Now only carts and post gigs are to be seen, not even a post chaise. The mail coach was withdrawn ten years ago; a post-gig carrying one passenger runs between Falkirk and Glasgow. It is however easy and inexpensive to use the canal to travel to Glasgow, Edinburgh and Stirling (by a connecting coach) .

Kippen
OSA: Moss Logan ; bridges; carts etc ; roads/tryst

Ford of Frew Kippen

In Moss Logan (NMRS record), a way formed of tree trunks has been found which is very similar to a Roman way over the moss of Kincardine.
There are bridges over the Forth at Cardross (1772) and Frew (1783). In 1745 the rebel army passed over the Ford of Frew on its way to Stirling.
There are 285 carts and three 2-wheeled chaisses in the parish.
The road from here to Glasgow by Campsie moor used to be very bad and near impassable in winter. It was turnpiked in 1792. An act has now been obtained to turnpike the Military road and as the two roads pass through Kippen, this will be of much benefit.
Kippen would make a good location for a tryst.

NSA
Stirling, 10 miles away is the nearest market.
Kippern and Buchlyvie have regular postal services.
Seven miles of the Sirling to Dumbarton road run through here and there is a good turnpike from Kippen to Glasgow. There are bridges at Frew and Cardross - the Callendar to Glasgow road uses the latter.
Coal comes 12 miles from Bannockburn and peat is also much used. Coal and lime being so distant, it would be advantageous to have a canal or railway here.

United Parish of Larbert and Dunipace
OSA: cattle tryst p. 335; Roman road p. 336; roads p. 337
A cattle tryst is held in October with 20,000 to 30,000 cattle.
A great Roman causeway that ran from Carmuirs camp in Falkirk parish, crossed the Carron by a bridge west of Larbert, and took a direct line to Stirling Castle, is still entire in many parts today.
The Stirling to Edinburgh road passes through the parish with a toll at Torwood. The rest of the roads are statute labour.

NSA; see also ; Dunipace
The Falkirk tryst is held here, there being three large markets for the sale of black cattle, horses and sheep.
Details given of the Carron Ironworks. Slag was used to repair the roads.
Penny-posts at Carron and Larbert. The mail coach and another coach come through Larbert and there are coaches to Glasgow and Edinburgh that pass through Carronshore.

One of the hills at Dunipace
One of the hills at Dunipace

Dunipace   There was a fine hill some 40 feet in height that was thought to be artificial and which was quarried for stones for the roads, including the construction of an embankment on the turnpike near Denny bridge. However, although some human remains were found at the top, the hill proved to be natural. The name Dunipace is thought by some to mean "hills of death" (there being some small low hills here), perhaps relating to the ford hereabouts that must have seen many a conflict.
A bridge was built over the Carron near Dunipace House in 1824. Before that time a ford was used for carriages and "steps" for people on foot. The old bridge over the Carron (NMRS record) between Dunipace and Denny was replaced in 1828 because it was too high and narrow for carriages, and also unsafe.

Logie
OSA
No mention of roads

NSA; Roman ford & causeway
There was a Roman fort and causeway across the Forth at Manor. Part of this causeway was broken up some years ago.
Stirling and Alloa serve as market towns.
The turnpikes to Crieff, Alloa, Dollar and Stirling amount to about twelve miles of road and cross each other at the village of Causewayhead. The roads are poor, particularly the Crieff road which in addition is "rendered impassable by tolls" - it has seven tolls within two miles of the manse.
Letter carriers bring the post from Stirling.
The Perth to Glasgow mail coach passes through as do two other coaches, and there is an omnibus between Stirling and Alloa and one in summer from Bridge of Allan to Stirling.
There is a fine new bridge over the Forth at Stirling, the old one being thought unsafe. The bridge over the Allan is old, narrow and dangerous.

Muiravonside
OSA
No mention of roads

NSA
p. 211 Linlithgow Bridge was built about 1650.
p. 213 Falkirk though further away than Linlithgow is preferred as the market town. As well as the Union Canal and railways, the Stirling to Edinburgh road runs through the parish.

Polmont
Parish map - sheet 31, just east of Falkirk
OSA
No mention of roads

NSA
Falkirk is the nearest market and post town, though the runner has such a large area to cover that mail is often delayed.
The parish has two miles of turnpike with regular coaches to Edinburgh, Glasgow and Stirling. The Union Canal runs through here and a railway is projected.

St Ninianís (formerly Eggles)
OSA ; Roman road
A road runs 15 or 16 miles from Powbridge in the east of the parish over to Randyford in the west.
A Roman causeway runs NW through Torwood. In the parish there are 7 miles of the Edinburgh to Stirling turnpike, 5 miles of the Stirling to Glasgow road and 12 miles of the road from Dunbarton to the ferry near Alloa. Roads and bridges here are good.
The statute labour conversion money is 18/- per 100 L Scots.

NSA; Romans 1-p.315 and p.322
Lime and coal are shipped from Fallin and bricks and tiles from Throsk.
The Roman road through this parish has been used by different armies in the past. Where the road meets the Forth, opposite Kildean, the battle of Stirling (Bridge) was fought in 1297. There was a ford some two foot deep at low water and a wooden bridge (NMRS record - see Stirling below) which was capably used by Wallace to defeat the English.
There are several Roman posts in the area, with good intervisibility between some of them which would have allowed rapid deployment of troops.

Circular arch bridge in Bannockburn. Click for larger image.
This unusual bridge was designed by Thomas Telford. Along with its associated road, it replaced the original route through Bannockburn over the nearby Old Town Bridge in 1819. Map of area. Based on 1" OS map, 1906. With thanks. The Old Town Bridge {NMRS record) was built in 1519 by Robert Spittal who also paid for the bridge at Doune to spite the ferryman who refused to carry him across.

Stirling is the market town although Falkirk is also attended. Post is delivered from Stirling.
The Glasgow and Edinburgh roads run for several miles through the parish; both with regular coach services. There is also the road from Dumbarton to the ferry near Alloa and from Carron-bridge to Randieford. There are many small bridges.
There is an important cattle and horse fair held near Bannockburn which is attended by dealers from Edinburgh and Glasgow and other places nearby. Another fair has declined in importance. Coal is obtained locally and some peat is used in the higher parts of the parish.

Slamannan or St Lawrence
OSA
The roads are very bad, however, a recent road through the Moss Candle has made it much easier to reach Falkirk. A proposed road between Edinburgh and Glasgow which will go by Bathgate and Airdrie will also be of benefit.

NSA
There have been few changes here since the last Account was written except in agriculture and the coming of the railway.
A survey for a turnpike between Falkirk and Airdrie was carried out a couple of years ago but it is likely to prove very expensive to construct due to the nature of the ground. However, the railway is sufficient for reaching these places.
The distance from the lime works at Bathgate and Cumbernauld and the poor roads are disadvantages to the parish.

Stirling
OSA
Mention of Stirling Bridge. Because of Stirling's situation and its bridge, it is "the great thoroughfare of the north of Scotland."

NSA; Romans; also
The Forth can be navigated as far as Stirling by vessels of 70 tons.
The Roman road from Camelon northwards passed close to the south-west side of the Castle-hill or perhaps through a nearby hollow-way called Ballingeich Road.
The stone piers on which the bridge at Kildean (NMRS record - see also 1, 2) rested can still be seen under the river.
A considerable number of vessels use the port of Stirling.
Stirling serves as a market town and has several fairs for horses, wool etc during the year.
Mail goes to Edinburgh and Glasgow and many other towns. There are turnpike roads in various directions and many public carriages on the roads. Some two or three steam boats run each day to Newhaven or Granton Pier - these call at other places on the way. Of the two bridges over the Forth, one is very old and narrow.
Coal is obtained from nearby pits.
Streets in the town are much improved both in regard to the causeway and the side-pavement.

Strathblane
OSA
Good roads in the parish. The Glasgow to Balfron and the Glasgow to Drymen turnpikes are parallel to each other, about 2 miles apart. Both join the Stirling to Dumbarton military road. Another road runs NW from the Edinburgh road near Kilsyth to the military road. The western part of this road used to be impassable.
A bridge over the Leven (at Balloch) is proposed - this would give a very easy route between Edinburgh and the west Highlands. All these roads have been much improved in the last 6 years.

NSA
The nearest market town is Glasgow and carriers from Balfron go there four times a week as well as a coach from Balfron three times a week. There is a daily post.
There are ten miles of turnpike road. Draught horses find the road through the Strath difficult because of its narrowness and steepness. There are ten bridges.
A cattle fair is held in November. Coal is brought from Kirkintilloch, Campsie, Baldernock and New Kilpatrick.

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Interesting Points

Airth
The Abbey-town bridge is thought to have been on a direct road to an abbey in Airth. There are ferries on the Forth at Kersie and Higginís Neuk with piers on both sides. A boat sails between Airth and Dunmore to Alva once a day. There are harbours at Airth, Dunmore and Newmiln.

Balfron
The arrival of the first caravan for the "conveyance of goods and passengers" was quite an event.

Buchanan
The road from Drymen is only now complete after 30 years work under the statute labour system. A garrison was built at Inversnaid about 80 years ago to prevent stolen cattle being moved north through the pass between Loch Catrine and Loch Lomond.

Campsie
A road between Campsie Kirk and the Crow Road (leading to Fintry and Stirling) would be only 600 yards long but would save 3 miles. There are several causeways on the line of road to the church, said to have been built by offenders in the past as a penance.

Falkirk
A Roman road runs through the parish from Castlecary fort to Camelon. Passage boats run to Edinburgh and Glasgow on both the Union canal and the Forth and Clyde canal.

Gargunnock Farmers often complain about the roads and say they will work on them but as soon as the weather improves they forget about the problem. Beggars pass through the parish and prove a nuisance. Tenants beside the Forth have boats but these are not suitable for horses or loaded carts. The Military Road between Stirling and Dumbarton, made 30 or 40 years ago, is to become a turnpike. The Peel of Gargunnock is thought to have protected a ford. Further upriver a small fortress defended the Ford of Frew. Just half a mile above the Peel there was an old bridge called the bridge of Offers which Wallace is said to have used.

Killearn
Cattle thieving was common up to 1743. Protection was offered to cattle owners by means of "Black Mail".

Kilsyth Auchinstenie bridge was thought to be Roman but the remains of a paved ford were found near the bridge and there was a tradition of someone dying 100 years ago on the ford. Old records show it dates from around 1670. Since the new Cumbernauld road opened hardly any traffic comes through here.

Kippen
In Moss Logan a way formed of tree trunks has been found which is very similar to a Roman way over the moss of Kincardine. In 1745 the rebel army passed over the Ford of Frew on its way to Stirling.

Larbert and Dunipace
A great Roman causeway that ran through here is still entire in many parts today. A cattle tryst is held in October with 20,000 to 30,000 cattle. Slag from the Carron Ironworks is used to repair the roads.

Logie
There was a Roman fort and causeway across the Forth at Manor. Part of this causeway was broken up some years ago.

Muiravonside Linlithgow Bridge was built about 1650.

St Ninianís
Where the Roman road meets the Forth, opposite Kildean, the battle of Stirling (Bridge) was fought in 1297. There was a ford some two foot deep at low water and a wooden bridge which was capably used by Wallace to defeat the English. There are several Roman posts in the area, with good intervisibility between some of them.

Stirling
The Forth can be navigated as far as Stirling by vessels of 70 tons. The Roman road from Camelon northwards passed close to the south-west side of the Castle-hill or perhaps through a nearby hollow-way called Ballingeich Road. The stone piers on which the bridge at Kildean rested can still be seen under the river.

Strathblane
A bridge over the Leven (at Balloch) is proposed - this would give a very easy route between Edinburgh and the west Highlands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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